Optimal Height for 3D TV

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Optimal Height for 3D TV

I just bought a 3D tv for my family and we are ready to install it on our wall. Does anybody have a suggestion on the optimal height or placement on the wall? Thanks!
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Occasional Contributor

Re: Optimal Height for 3D TV

@Sam - Congrats on your new 3D. Your familiy is going to love it! I had the same issue when I brought mine home. It's really something to consider so it's good that you asked. Take a look at this distance calculator, it helped me.  Acme should have one of these installed.  http://hdinstallers.com/calculator.htm

 

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Re: Optimal Height for 3D TV

Once you get too far to either side of the TV, the picture will begin to flatten. And once you get to about a 45-degree angle, the picture is almost completely flat. It's important to set up your furniture with that in mind. If you're going to have more than four people watching TV at once, it's best to have some people sitting behind others. The perfect situation would be theater-style graduated seating, but assuming that you can't afford to turn your living room into a minitheater, the next best arrangement is cushions on the floor, a couch, and barstools. One more thing to note: If your group is watching material with a lot of movement (sports or action films), viewers sitting at an angle might start to feel queasy. They can mitigate the effect by moving farther away from the TV--the larger the angle, the farther away the viewer should be. Remember this when you set up seats for your Super Bowl party. Hope that helps!
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Re: Optimal Height for 3D TV

Sam,

 

These are the main issues you need to consider when you are placing your new 3D TV.

 

3D TV Viewing Issues

 

Three main issues that consumers encounter when watching 3D are: reduction in brightness, "ghosting" (also referred to as crosstalk), and motion blur.

 

1. Brightness: The reduction in brightness is the result of having to view 3D images through either Active Shutter or Passive Polarized 3D Glasses. This can reduce the brightness of the incoming images up to 50%.

 

2. Ghosting/Crosstalk: This occurs when the left and right eye images are not synched exactly with the LCD shutters or polarized filters in 3D glasses. What happens is that an object(s) in an image appears to have a duplicate image that looks like a halo or ghost around the actual object.

 

3. Motion Blur: Another problem is that when objects move fast across the screen, the objects may seem blurry or stutter more than they might do on 2D source material. However, despite these issues, there is practical action you can take that may minimize these issues without calling in a tech guru.

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Occasional Contributor

Re: Optimal Height for 3D TV

Sam,

 

Here's some info I found helpful.

  Where to mount your TV

Ideally, the middle of your TV screen needs to be at about eye level while you're seated.

 

You'll want to be comfortable while watching TV, and mounting it too high can result in neck strain. Plus, you'll probably see the best-looking picture when you view your TV head-on, rather than at an angle. If you opt for a higher placement, consider using a tilting wall mount to angle the TV down.

 

Screen glare
To test:  Sit in your favorite TV-watching spot and look at the place on the wall where you plan to mount your TV. Is there light reflecting off that area? If so, is it something fixable (by closing the curtains, or by moving a lamp)? Screen glare can be distracting, and detract from an otherwise beautiful picture, so be aware of potential sources of glare. A tilting or swiveling mount can also help you cut down on glare, by allowing you to angle the TV's screen away from the light source.

 

 

Using a TV stand may help.

 

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