Are sound bars a sound investment?

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New Content Contributor

Are sound bars a sound investment?

I like the looks of a sound bar rather than speakers, but wonder how much I'm giving up on sound.

 

Thoughts, anyone?

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New Content Contributor

Re: Are sound bars a sound investment?

Those sleek sound bar-style speakers you're talking about look good with a  flat-panel TV, and require minimal space and wiring. Most models even offer built-in amplification, which means the only other gear you'll need is a DVD or Blu-ray Disc player and a subwoofer for deep bass roar and rumble. Some of  models even include a subwoofer. In a nutshell, single-speaker sound bars can deliver room-filling sound without taking up much space.

This may be the solution for you if:

  • You have very limited room for speakers or other equipment. The sound bar solution requires fewer pieces of gear than any of the other options out there, and you can easily wall-mount the main speaker right below your TV.
  • Very simple setup is key. You only need a couple of cables to hook up these systems, and chances are they come in the box. You won't have to run wires from one side of your room to the other, either.
  • You want the cinematic thrill of surround sound but your room can't accommodate a full-fledged surround system. Some of the more deluxe models feature advanced designs and special digital processing to create a convincing, three-dimensional sound field.

 

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Occasional Contributor

Re: Are sound bars a sound investment?

Here are some other things to think about, Bro.

 

While some sound bars only deliver stereo sound, others create virtual surround sound. Now, they can't give you the same precise, enveloping sound you'd get from a system with five or more speakers. But they can offer more engaging audio than your TV speakers and give you a more complete sound experience.

 

Soundbar.jpgThey accomplish virtual surround sound by bouncing "beams" of sound off your walls, or with special processing that controls timing and volume to make sound effects seem like they're coming from different directions.